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3626 North Elm Street
Greensboro, NC 27455
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Cat Bathing & Hygiene


This collection of Cat Bathing & Hygiene articles has been curated for you by North Elm Animal Hospital. If you would like to talk to a veterinarian, please give us a call at 336-505-4435.

Matting in Cats

Matted fur is a condition that occurs mostly in longhaired cats when their fur becomes knotted and entangled. There are several reasons this can happen. When a cat sheds their undercoat, the fur can become caught in the top coat. If a cat’s fur becomes dirty or oily, it can also become entwined and matted.


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Hairballs in Cats: Causes, Symptoms, and What You Can Do About Them

If you’ve ever seen your cat gagging and eventually cough up a hairball, then you know the situation. You know they’re no fun to clean up, and worse, they can cause health problems for your cat. What you might not know is what causes hairballs, what symptoms to look for and what you can do to prevent them.

What is a Hairball in Cats?

You already know that your cat spends hours every day grooming himself. What you might not realize is that your cat swallows a lot of hair in the process!


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Is Your Kitty a Hazard to Your Health?

Toxoplasmosis, a disease caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, has been scaring pregnant women and families for years—and cats have a bad reputation of being the source! The truth is, despite the feline’s connection to this parasite, family pets are likely not the cause of this disease in human cases. Most commonly, human infection occurs as a result of gardening in contaminated soil or handling raw meat.


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How to Handle Hairballs

Cats are typically fastidious groomers and therefore ingest a significant amount of hair. Hair is undigestible and can sit in the stomach until enough hair is accumulated to produce a signal that induces vomiting. Even though people often say their cat is “coughing up a hairball,” this is not the correct terminology. The hair is coming from the gastrointestinal tract, not the respiratory tract.


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