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3626 North Elm Street
Greensboro, NC 27455
Open Mon-Fri: 8 am - 5 pm,
Sat: 8 am to 12 pm
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Cats


Cat Grooming: What's Unusual?

If your cat is like most felines, she spends hours every day grooming herself. Lick the paws, check. Use the damp paws to clean behind the ears, check. Your cat is capable of bending and contorting herself into all manner of funny positions to aim that rough tongue “just so” at a particular problem area.

In general finicky cats are pretty good at keeping themselves clean.  However, it turns out there are other reasons your cat grooms him or herself besides cleanliness.


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Six Pet Poison Myths - Solved!

 

Do you know the truth behind these pet poison myths?

Myth #1: It is safe to use human toothpaste on my dog’s teeth.

True or false? FALSE.

Many human toothpastes contain xylitol, an artificial sweetener that causes a rapid drop in blood sugar and liver failure in dogs. Xylitol is also commonly found in sugar-free gum and candy, as well as certain medications and nasal sprays.


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Microchipping Your Cat is Easy and Effective

Have you ever wondered what you’d do if your cat was lost? If you’re like many people you’d post pictures of Fluffy on Facebook and make an announcement. That’s a good approach to spread the word with or without a microchip. However, microchipping your cat is so simple and effective, there’s no reason not to do it. It only takes seconds to place the chip under your cat’s skin and yet, according to Petfinder, it increases your odds of being reunited with your cat by more than 2000%. “Less than 2 percent of lost cats that entered the animal shelters were reunited with their families.


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Holiday Foods on the Naughty List

We all love to indulge around the holidays, especially when it comes to food. Unfortunately, tossing your pet table scraps as a “treat” can cause unnecessary upset to their digestive system. Read our recommendations before including Fido or Fluffy at the dinner table this year. Your pet’s tummy will thank you!

 


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Commercial Rodenticide Emits Gas Toxic to Pets and Humans

Rodenticide, commonly used to kill rats, mice, moles and gophers, comes in many forms and can cause a variety of serious problems in our pets.

Rodenticide containing cholecalciferol (Vitamin D) causes high calcium levels in the blood and can damage the kidneys, central nervous system, heart and intestines. Poisons that contain bromethalin are neurotoxic, and can cause paralysis and possibly coma. Brodifacoum, warfarin and other anticoagulant rodenticides cause an inability to clot the blood and often lead to internal bleeding.


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Keep Pets Happy and Healthy This Halloween

Halloween is supposed to be spooky, but it can be an especially stressful night for the furry little monsters in your house. Follow these tips to keep the holiday fun—not frightening—for your family pets.

Stranger danger!

Visitors (in costume, no less!) are often scary and stressful for pets.


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Is Your Senior Cat in Pain?

While our cats are generally living longer, a feline is still considered a senior at age 11 (about 60 in human years) and geriatric at 15 (76 years for a human). So although your kitty may be young at heart, it is important to remember that senior and geriatric cats are more at risk for arthritis, especially in the hips and spine.


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